June in Illinois – Hot and Dry

Temperature

The hot and dry weather continued in Illinois for June. The statewide average temperature for the month was 72.9 degrees, a full degree above normal. There were a few cool periods during the month, but everyone will remember the hot ending to the month with highs in the upper 90s and low 100s. Some 56 sites broke daily records on June 28 and 29. While the month was warm, it is far behind the hottest June on record* in Illinois, 1934 with a state-wide average temperature of 78.5 degrees.

Every month this year has had above-normal temperatures. As a result, the statewide average of 52.8 degrees for the last 6 months is the warmest on record. It beats out a similar period for 1921 when the statewide average temperature was 52.1 degrees.

Precipitation

The statewide average precipitation for June was 1.77 inches, which is 2.3 inches below normal and 43 percent of normal. It was the eighth driest June on record. June 1988 was the driest on record at 1.05 inches.

The statewide average precipitation for the first half of 2012 was 12.58 inches, making it the sixth driest on record. The first half of 1988 was slightly worse at 12.00 inches. The driest January-June was 1934 with only 10.33 inches.

*statewide records go back to 1895.

Here is the June precipitation expressed as a total accumulation, a departure from normal, and percent of normal.

Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.
Click to enlarge.
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One thought on “June in Illinois – Hot and Dry

  1. […] It’s been a hot and dry start to 2012. January through March has been one of the hottest on record, and it’s also been dry. On the other hand April and early May have turned a bit cooler than normal, although it remains dry. So many things are coming in weeks early, but then some things froze mid-April, including the Apples, Pears, and Blueberries. June temps soared, though, with a number of 100 degree days.  Officially it’s been the hottest first 6 months on record for the state of Illinois, and the 6th driest according to the Illinois State Climatologist. […]

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